Harpeth River Canoe Float Slated For May 3

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Nashville, Tenn. – The Department of Environment and Conservation’s Division of Natural Areas will host a canoe float along the Harpeth River on May 3.  Participants should meet at 8 a.m. at the Kingston Springs City Park on Old Pinnacle Road.

Roger McCoy and Jane Polansky will take participants on a three and a half hour canoe float along one of Middle Tennessee’s most popular rivers. The float will begin at Kingston Springs and will end at the state-owned Gossett Tract, just north of U.S. Highway 70 along Cedar Hill Road. Shuttles will take participants from the Gossett Tract to Kingston Springs City Park after the float is finished.

“This waterway offers wonderful views of the native flora and fauna of the Western Highland Rim,” McCoy said. “Even for people familiar with the sights in this region, floating along the Harpeth River will provide a different and very enjoyable perspective.”

Participants should bring water, snacks and lunch, and they should wear appropriate clothing. Reservations are required for the canoe float and can be made by contacting Roger McCoy by phone at (615) 532-0431 or by e-mail at roger [dot] mccoy [at] state [dot] tn [dot] us by April 28. Participants are welcome to bring their own canoes or kayaks. Canoe rentals will be available for $25 per canoe.

The Harpeth River is a tributary of the Cumberland River and one of Middle Tennessee’s major streams. As a class II river, the Harpeth offers ample opportunities for both beginning and advanced paddlers to perfect their skills and enjoy floating along a beautiful waterway. The Harpeth River also is home to large and small mouth bass, bluegill, channel catfish and several other species of fish and aquatic creatures.  

The canoe float on the Harpeth River is part of a series of monthly, guided field trips to Tennessee State Natural Areas offered by the department’s Division of Natural Areas.  Tennessee has 79 designated State Natural Areas throughout the state, covering approximately 110,000 acres of ecologically significant lands.  More information about Tennessee’s natural areas program, including a complete list of all natural areas and scheduled field trips, can be found at http://tn.gov/environment/na/.