FWC Relocates Miami-area Crocodile, Offers Safety Tips

No Gravatar

American Crocodile - FWC biologists and licensed trappers captured this American crocodile in Coral Gables and took it to a relocation site.  - (FWC Photo)The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), along with licensed trappers, captured and relocated a nearly 11-foot-long American crocodile from a Coral Gables, Miami neighborhood. 

This is the second time this particular crocodile has been relocated.  The crocodile found its way back to the same neighborhood canal after the previous relocation.

This crocodile has been blamed for eating at least three neighborhood dogs.  In order to protect their pets, pet owners should keep their pets away from the water or water’s edge, on a leash or in a fenced area. 

It is against the law to feed, touch or harass crocodiles.  Fishermen are asked not to throw fish scraps back in the water, which may attract crocodiles and potentially teach them to associate people with food.  Fishermen should discard their scraps in a garbage can. 

Crocodiles present a minimal danger to people.  There have been no documented bites on a person by an American crocodile in Florida. 

FWC biologists and licensed trappers captured this American crocodile in Coral Gables and took it to a relocation site.  - (FWC Photo)The American crocodile is an endangered species success story. Once one of the most critically endangered species in North America, it has recovered and is becoming a relatively common occurrence in coastal areas of South Florida.  As many as 2,000 non-hatchling crocodiles may now live in Florida. 

The American crocodile is still listed as endangered by the state.  However, as a result of the Florida population’s recovery, the federal listing has been upgraded from endangered to threatened.

Relocating crocodiles is seldom effective because most crocodiles return to their capture site. Therefore, people who live in coastal areas of South Florida should take common-sense precautions to coexist with crocodiles. Safety tips are available online at MyFWC.com/Crocodile/docs/LivingwithCrocodiles.pdf.

To report a crocodile, call the FWC’s Statewide Nuisance Alligator Hotline at 1-866-FWC-GATOR.